Category Archives: Designing for Experience

Touchpoints Bring CX To Life – Adam Richardson on HBR

It’s great to see serious business forums, such as the Harvard Business Review blog, picking up on topics like customer experience. I’m following Adam Richardson’s series on customer journey mapping (CJM) with enthusiasm. I recently pointed to one of his artciles that introduced

Touchpoints Bring CX To Life – Adam Richardson on HBR

It’s great to see serious business forums, such as the Harvard Business Review blog, picking up on topics like customer experience. I’m following Adam Richardson’s series on customer journey mapping (CJM) with enthusiasm. I recently pointed to one of his artciles that introduced

Emotions and Design – Mood Maps

via Steve Baty, I came across a post by Will Evans called Design Ethnography & Mood Maps. He touches on two of my favorite topics at the moment: ethnography and emotions in design. In particular, Will introduces the concepts of

Emotions and Design – Mood Maps

via Steve Baty, I came across a post by Will Evans called Design Ethnography & Mood Maps. He touches on two of my favorite topics at the moment: ethnography and emotions in design. In particular, Will introduces the concepts of

Usability of Paper

I’m not necessarily a proponent of persisting paper-based resources per se, at least not from a sentimental or habitual perspective. Instead, I see a real experiential value to paper–one that’s hard to replicate with a computer. People like to read

Usability of Paper

I’m not necessarily a proponent of persisting paper-based resources per se, at least not from a sentimental or habitual perspective. Instead, I see a real experiential value to paper–one that’s hard to replicate with a computer. People like to read

Misconceptions in UX – Whitney Hess Post

Whitney Hess has done her homework and talked to a sampling of thought leaders in UX about misconceptions in the field. See her post “10 Most Common Misconceptions About User Experience Design.” There’s not too much new here in terms

Misconceptions in UX – Whitney Hess Post

Whitney Hess has done her homework and talked to a sampling of thought leaders in UX about misconceptions in the field. See her post “10 Most Common Misconceptions About User Experience Design.” There’s not too much new here in terms

How Buildings Learn TV Series

Stewart Brand, author of How Buildings Learn, has made available a program he created for the BBC in 1997. There are six 30-minute videos in all posted on Google Video: Part I Part II Part III Part IV Part V

How Buildings Learn TV Series

Stewart Brand, author of How Buildings Learn, has made available a program he created for the BBC in 1997. There are six 30-minute videos in all posted on Google Video: Part I Part II Part III Part IV Part V

Book Review: Subject To Change

Subject To Change, by Peter Merholz, Brandon Schauer, David Verba, and Todd Wilkens (Adaptive Paths), O’Reilly, 2008   In 1999, Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger formulated their 95 theses into what became the Cluetrain Manifesto, which

Book Review: Subject To Change

Subject To Change, by Peter Merholz, Brandon Schauer, David Verba, and Todd Wilkens (Adaptive Paths), O’Reilly, 2008   In 1999, Rick Levine, Christopher Locke, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger formulated their 95 theses into what became the Cluetrain Manifesto, which

London Business School Study on Innovation in Experiential Services

Chris Voss and Leonieke Zomerdijk of the London Business School released a long-ish paper back in June 2007 about the role of customer experience in designing innovative services. See the full report online: Innovation in Experiential Services: An Empirical View

London Business School Study on Innovation in Experiential Services

Chris Voss and Leonieke Zomerdijk of the London Business School released a long-ish paper back in June 2007 about the role of customer experience in designing innovative services. See the full report online: Innovation in Experiential Services: An Empirical View